The Godhead ArchetypewithJames P. Driscoll

james driscoll

new-thinking-allowed

James P. Driscoll, PhD, is one of the foremost critics of Renaissance literature from a Jungian perspective. He is author of Identity in Shakespearean Drama and The Unfolding God of Jung and Milton.

Here he points out that, in Jungian psychological theory, the godhead archetype is representative of the larger self. This larger self includes many unconscious processes and is vastly greater than the ego. It can also be thought of as the self of society, or of the biosphere, or even of the cosmos. Jung was critical of the Christian view of the trinity, insofar as it excluded a specifically feminine principle. James Driscoll points out, however, that in the earliest Jewish and Christian traditions, the holy spirit itself was viewed as feminine. This feminine element was removed under the influence of Greek philosophy that regarded the feminine as imperfect. Driscoll also emphasizes the importance of the struggle between the two hostile brothers (i.e., Christ and Satan) as a key component of the western godhead archetype.

(Recorded on July 2, 2017)

Published on July 3, 2017

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